Thoughts on the future of composition

The act of composing is difficult. Whether one is a noble-laureate or a distracted English 15 student rushing to meet a deadline, the image of the blank Word-document is an intimidating one. But it is on this tabula rasa that writers ply their craft (with various levels of success), and rhetoricians and compositionists have been … Continue reading Thoughts on the future of composition

Stiegler and “Where education went wrong with Biopower?”

I will start off my blog confessing Bernard Stielger’s French-style is tough to read (as care-less as it is to say). But nonetheless he does posit a powerful – and rather Gramscian – point when he says “My thesis is that this history is organological; indeed that intelligence regarding intelligence is organological intelligence” (30). In … Continue reading Stiegler and “Where education went wrong with Biopower?”

Does Writing Have a Future in the Peripheries?

Critical theorist, Vilém Flusser’s main agendas is a “recoding of history” not in terms of historical consciousness, but on the operative imperatives of apparatuses. This recoding inevitably takes the form of imperialism that at first glance appears to advocate a “value-free regime,” but which Flusser writes is better understood as an “order [of] all values … Continue reading Does Writing Have a Future in the Peripheries?

On Shuvo’s Murder: An obituary for Bangladesh

The recent news about the murder of Ahmed Rajib Haider (Shuvo) is deeply saddening and outrageous. Though more information will hopefully surface about the crime, initial reports about it seem to explicitly and implicitly tie the crime with the Shabag movement. Initial reports and various facebook posts linking to his supposed blog portray him as a critic – … Continue reading On Shuvo’s Murder: An obituary for Bangladesh

Arundhati Roy’s “The Greater Common Good” and the Narmada Protests

The case of the Sardar Sarovar dam is an extremely complex one: involving the cost of massive environmental damage, internal displacements (of mostly adivasis, or tribals, dalits, or untouchables, and poor village populations) and the pull of economic development, of “India Shining.” The Sardar Sarovar dam, the largest of 30 dams to be constructed on … Continue reading Arundhati Roy’s “The Greater Common Good” and the Narmada Protests