Framing 101: How to Take Back Public Discourse

y George Lakoff Excerpted from “Don’t think of an elephant! Know your values and frame the debate — The essential guide for progressives.” JANUARY 21, 2004 On this date I spoke extemporaneously to a group of about two hundred progressive citizen-activists in Sausalito, California. When I teach the study of framing at Berkeley, in Cognitive … Continue reading Framing 101: How to Take Back Public Discourse

New chapter on plurilingualism and religious texts by 19th century Muslim Bengali communities (ask me if you need a copy)

Rabbi, S. “The Sociolinguistics of South Asian Cosmopolitan Literature: The Dubhasa (Mixed Language Modes) of the Puthi Tradition in Muslim Bengal.” In J. Lee (Ed.) The Sociolinguistics of Global Asias (pp. 156-170). New York: Routledge. Abstract: Scholars of language have long been interested in the widespread plurilingualism of South Asian communication. These linguistic practices provide … Continue reading New chapter on plurilingualism and religious texts by 19th century Muslim Bengali communities (ask me if you need a copy)

Piece on the Uptake Processes of Feedback in the Journal of Response to Writing

This is my new article in the Journal of Response to Writing titled "Uptake Processes in Academic Genres: The Socialization of an Advanced Academic Writer Through Feedback Activities." In this study I examine and interpret the case of a graduate student negotiating in-person and textually mediated feedback in research group meetings and reviewers' letters. I … Continue reading Piece on the Uptake Processes of Feedback in the Journal of Response to Writing

Co-written piece on Cosmopolitanism and Plurilingual Education with Dr. Suresh Canagarajah

The Routledge Handbook of Plurilingual Language Education is out now. It includes a co-written chapter by me and Dr. Suresh Canagarajah "Cosmopolitanism and Plurilingual Traditions: Learning from South Asian and Southern African Practices of Intercultural Communication". It seems to be available to read on Google books for now, which is cool. In the chapter we … Continue reading Co-written piece on Cosmopolitanism and Plurilingual Education with Dr. Suresh Canagarajah

Mystification and Idealism in Higher Education

When my mind wonders, which is often, I end up fixating on the significance of such architecture and design. What do these grand buildings mean? Why are they here in the middle of sheep fields where the air can souped with the odor of manure on humid afternoons? Why are those of us who live here do so with such a sense of purpose and pretension about our urbanity and sophistication?

What Does It Mean to Write in an Everyday Life?

There is a paradox to literacy in our contemporary societies. This generation – sometimes called digital natives – read and write more than any other in history; yet, they are also as adverse to writing activities as all others. Go ahead, and ask any student on any college campus when was the last time they … Continue reading What Does It Mean to Write in an Everyday Life?

Summary of “Mapping Rhetorical Knowledge in Advanced Academic Writers”

My research shows that these writers and communicators disambiguate rhetorical knowledge in genres in terms of textual purpose, audience expectations, writer’s tasks and discursive forms. These discrete understandings are integrated in their performances through this conceptualization of writing genres as textual transactions. Approaching communication in such terms shows how writing tasks can be framed to help writers negotiate readers’ interests, constraints, and values in generative ways in genres.

Zombie Paradigms in the Classroom: Assuaging the Problems of Current-Traditionalism

The field of writing studies has been arguing for decades about disposing of current-traditionalism (CT). Scholars, professional groups, graduate students, and even deans now advocate for teaching written communication in other ways. These new paradigms, collectively known as post-process, have shown considerably better student outcomes and improved teaching experience. Yet, the fact remains that they … Continue reading Zombie Paradigms in the Classroom: Assuaging the Problems of Current-Traditionalism

The Language of Puthis: Dubhashi and the Bengali Muslims

Muslims in the region of Bengal, like other Muslims in the Northwest of India, viewed that different languages in the space social space was natural and by God's design. This was the way it always was after all, and pointed to Qur'anic ayats, such as the one above , to argue that the wise person had to know and communicate in many languages. It also means sometimes people would mix different languages as they saw fit for their pupose in single utterances. This view can be seen in the way the puthi genres made use of dubhashi (a language made up of Bangla, Hindustani, Farsi, and Arabic). Their writers and performances only thought about ways to best communicate Islamic ideas and views, not whether what the language they used was proper or not.