Toward Antiracist First-Year Composition Goals

We are finally ready to offer the FYC goals statement that my colleagues and I worked on. If you are unfamiliar with the history of how this document came to be, you can read about it in my past blog posts on the subject: "Why I Left The CWPA (Council of Writing Program Administrators)," Apr 18,…Toward … Continue reading Toward Antiracist First-Year Composition Goals

So You’re Going to Teach Composition

I wrote this originally for the composition TAs I am supervising, but the questions are relevant to anyone designing a university-level reading/writing course. In subsequent posts, I will expand on many of these ideas. These posts will be listed on the page, “Teaching First-Year Composition.” When I taught my first composition course, more than 30 … Continue reading So You’re Going to Teach Composition

A WPA Roundtable: Implementing Program-Wide Writing Studies-Based Composition Pedagogies

A WPA Roundtable: Implementing Program-Wide Writing Studies-Based Composition Pedagogies Abstract In this roundtable, five WPAs discuss how they implemented program-wide writing studies-based curricula, addressing concerns such as expertise, labor, resistance, and assessment. Introduction The history of so-called “writing about writing” approaches to teaching composition is well-documented (Downs and Wardle, “Teaching”; Wardle and Downs, “looking”; Bird, … Continue reading A WPA Roundtable: Implementing Program-Wide Writing Studies-Based Composition Pedagogies

Online Education During the Pandemic (Part 1)

This is part one of a two-part interview with Mia Young-Adeyeba and Michelle Touceda on the topic of online education during the pandemic.Mia Young-Adeyeba is a veteran English teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District. She has a passion for helping students develop into lifelong learners and for cultivating collaborative partnerships. In addition to being a high school…Online … Continue reading Online Education During the Pandemic (Part 1)

Zombie Paradigms in the Classroom: Assuaging the Problems of Current-Traditionalism

The field of writing studies has been arguing for decades about disposing of current-traditionalism (CT). Scholars, professional groups, graduate students, and even deans now advocate for teaching written communication in other ways. These new paradigms, collectively known as post-process, have shown considerably better student outcomes and improved teaching experience. Yet, the fact remains that they … Continue reading Zombie Paradigms in the Classroom: Assuaging the Problems of Current-Traditionalism

Calm and Compassionate Online Teaching: Q&A with Shelley Rodrigo

Rochelle (Shelley) Rodrigo has been teaching online for more than 20 years. She has also developed and administered an online writing program and supported instructors as an instructional technologist. Shelley is the interim director of the writing program; associate professor in the rhetoric, composition, and the teaching of English (RCTE); and associate writing specialist (continuing … Continue reading Calm and Compassionate Online Teaching: Q&A with Shelley Rodrigo

Universities’ betrayal of online pedagogy during the pandemic

When instructors were suddenly pushed into online teaching last Spring, many online education experts predicted that the long term impact on online education as a whole would not be pretty. Some instructors who had never engaged in systematic online course development — either by choice or circumstances — suddenly discovered that they could, in a … Continue reading Universities’ betrayal of online pedagogy during the pandemic

HBCUs vs. PWI: Racial identity and Academic Confidence

Informative piece on the experiences of Black students in HBCUs vs. PWIs. The need for culturally sensitive pedagogy is highlighted. A recent journal article entitled, “Motivational and Judgment Predictors of African American Academic Achievement at PWIs and HBCUs,” suggested that Black student achievement at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs) requires additional effort compared to Black student … Continue reading HBCUs vs. PWI: Racial identity and Academic Confidence