Audience Created

The concept of audience is a key composition concept. I love the series of Lunsford & Ede articles on audience and have been known to teach them as an example of how a concept in the field keeps being revised and re-examined. I think it’s time to re-look at “audience” again. Lundsford & Ede’s concept … Continue reading Audience Created

Composition and the Irrational: Some Lacanian Concepts

Note: The picture above represents an internet meme called “Doge.” This is related to the LOL Cats meme, but Doge must feature a picture of a shiba inu dog (a Japanese dog, very active and smart, I have known one), several ungrammatical phrases, usually two words, starting with “very,” “so,” “much,” “many,” or “such,” rendered … Continue reading Composition and the Irrational: Some Lacanian Concepts

The Enduring Relevance of Liberal Arts in India: Henry Derozio and the Bengal Renaissance

In 1852, the Indian mathematician Radhanath Sikdar became the first person to accurately measure Mount Everest, known until then as Peak XV, which the British had been trying — and failing — to do for decades. Two years later, Harachandra Ghosh, Sikdar’s friend from college, was elected judge in the Small Causes Court, the first … Continue reading The Enduring Relevance of Liberal Arts in India: Henry Derozio and the Bengal Renaissance

The Liberal Arts by Themselves Will not Save Democracy, but Teaching Them More Effectively Might

In the banking concept of education, knowledge is a gift bestowed by those who consider themselves knowledgeable upon those whom they consider to know nothing. […] It is not surprising that the banking concept of education regards men as adaptable, manageable beings. The more students work at storing the deposits entrusted to them, the less … Continue reading The Liberal Arts by Themselves Will not Save Democracy, but Teaching Them More Effectively Might

Summary of “Mapping Rhetorical Knowledge in Advanced Academic Writers”

My research shows that these writers and communicators disambiguate rhetorical knowledge in genres in terms of textual purpose, audience expectations, writer’s tasks and discursive forms. These discrete understandings are integrated in their performances through this conceptualization of writing genres as textual transactions. Approaching communication in such terms shows how writing tasks can be framed to help writers negotiate readers’ interests, constraints, and values in generative ways in genres.