The Enduring Relevance of Liberal Arts in India: Henry Derozio and the Bengal Renaissance

In 1852, the Indian mathematician Radhanath Sikdar became the first person to accurately measure Mount Everest, known until then as Peak XV, which the British had been trying — and failing — to do for decades. Two years later, Harachandra Ghosh, Sikdar’s friend from college, was elected judge in the Small Causes Court, the first … Continue reading The Enduring Relevance of Liberal Arts in India: Henry Derozio and the Bengal Renaissance

The Liberal Arts by Themselves Will not Save Democracy, but Teaching Them More Effectively Might

In the banking concept of education, knowledge is a gift bestowed by those who consider themselves knowledgeable upon those whom they consider to know nothing. […] It is not surprising that the banking concept of education regards men as adaptable, manageable beings. The more students work at storing the deposits entrusted to them, the less … Continue reading The Liberal Arts by Themselves Will not Save Democracy, but Teaching Them More Effectively Might

Summary of “Mapping Rhetorical Knowledge in Advanced Academic Writers”

My research shows that these writers and communicators disambiguate rhetorical knowledge in genres in terms of textual purpose, audience expectations, writer’s tasks and discursive forms. These discrete understandings are integrated in their performances through this conceptualization of writing genres as textual transactions. Approaching communication in such terms shows how writing tasks can be framed to help writers negotiate readers’ interests, constraints, and values in generative ways in genres.

Zombie Paradigms in the Classroom: Assuaging the Problems of Current-Traditionalism

The field of writing studies has been arguing for decades about disposing of current-traditionalism (CT). Scholars, professional groups, graduate students, and even deans now advocate for teaching written communication in other ways. These new paradigms, collectively known as post-process, have shown considerably better student outcomes and improved teaching experience. Yet, the fact remains that they … Continue reading Zombie Paradigms in the Classroom: Assuaging the Problems of Current-Traditionalism

Talking of Rhet-Com in Bangladesh

Speaking about Aristotle might be necessary because of the overwhelming impact he has had on so many academic fields, I will give you that. But I find it hard to rationalize speaking about Cicero or St. Augustine to a Bangladeshi audience. And if such ancient figures are bad enough - they at least have the comparative benefit of being on the written record as opposed to contemporaries in other parts of the word - talking about 20th century figures of rhetorical education as Kenneth Burke s simply inexcusable because they operate in a Western liberal, democratic principle that are not organic to the societies of the Global South. Furthermore, there are extant rhetorical figures and examples readily available for 20th century postcolonial contexts.

Maximum Profits and Maximum Power: Talking to Zephyr Teachout

Teachout is one of the best public intellectuals out there now, in my opinion. In her focus on political corruption in all its forms and the consolidation of power in corporate behemoths as its root, she what Chompsky was decades ago. It's telling that like him, she barely ever gets heard on the networks. When … Continue reading Maximum Profits and Maximum Power: Talking to Zephyr Teachout