Online resources for doctoral writers: an annotated bibliography

Our guest blogger is Siân Lund from the Royal College of Art PG Art and Design college in the UK. She has been the EAP (English for Academic Purposes) Coordinator for almost 6 years. She has a background in language education and is passionate about exploring diversity in communication with a special interest in acculturation processes. … Continue reading Online resources for doctoral writers: an annotated bibliography

What Does It Mean to Write in an Everyday Life?

There is a paradox to literacy in our contemporary societies. This generation – sometimes called digital natives – read and write more than any other in history; yet, they are also as adverse to writing activities as all others. Go ahead, and ask any student on any college campus when was the last time they … Continue reading What Does It Mean to Write in an Everyday Life?

Not White Supremacist Preparation, but Linguistic Reparations

So I woke up last night at about 1:30 am. I was dreaming about students, adults, and rooms, and a university. I was making arguments and talking with all these students, who were also writing teachers. They were leaving and coming into rooms. I was leaving and coming into rooms. Someone asked me about preparation, about…Not … Continue reading Not White Supremacist Preparation, but Linguistic Reparations

The Liberal Arts by Themselves Will not Save Democracy, but Teaching Them More Effectively Might

In the banking concept of education, knowledge is a gift bestowed by those who consider themselves knowledgeable upon those whom they consider to know nothing. […] It is not surprising that the banking concept of education regards men as adaptable, manageable beings. The more students work at storing the deposits entrusted to them, the less … Continue reading The Liberal Arts by Themselves Will not Save Democracy, but Teaching Them More Effectively Might

Book launch: Coaching and Mentoring for Academic Development

By Dr Kay Guccione, Senior Lecturer in Academic Development My co-author Dr Steve Hutchinson and I extend a huge thank you to everyone who joined us for our book launch on the 10th December 2020! Having guests from across the world join us to discuss the book’s themes and our perspectives on the value of coaching … Continue reading Book launch: Coaching and Mentoring for Academic Development

Busting mentoring myths

By Dr Kay Guccione, Senior Lecturer in Academic Development Mentoring is ‘unregulated’ as a learning and development practice. This means that practitioners of mentoring don’t require any specialist qualifications or to be licensed and the term can be used freely. This benefits our work in universities as it means that we are able to use both the terminology … Continue reading Busting mentoring myths

A Story about Becoming a University Teacher

Living by the Proverb ABSTRACT There seems to be a strong link between developing our identities and storytelling. As humans, we strive for coherence, and this coherence is found in stories (Hermans, 2001). This is an experimental paper telling a story about developing a brave, and authentic self as an educator (teacher) in Higher Education … Continue reading A Story about Becoming a University Teacher

Essay in the Point reflecting on universities without people

What do we lose, exactly, when we are forced off those podiums—when we are forced, for a long time, out of public life? To construct and display a public image of oneself is to make oneself legible. The need for legibility stems from a need for recognition; one needs to be seen and heard not only by others; in order to make sense of our own identities, we also need to recognize ourselves. Cast in this light, the ostentatious practices that are epitomized for Marías by those damn gowns—which serve “the twin functions of concealment and aesthetics”—are the manifestation of just that need.