Toward Antiracist First-Year Composition Goals

We are finally ready to offer the FYC goals statement that my colleagues and I worked on. If you are unfamiliar with the history of how this document came to be, you can read about it in my past blog posts on the subject: "Why I Left The CWPA (Council of Writing Program Administrators)," Apr 18,…Toward … Continue reading Toward Antiracist First-Year Composition Goals

Writing Thesis Statements as Enthymemes

By Jennifer Fletcher In my new book Writing Rhetorically, I share one of my favorite quotations from rhetoricians Edward P.J. Corbett and Rosa A. Eberly: “Reasoning, by itself, will not get the potatoes peeled” (1). It takes humans in communication with other humans to accomplish real work in the world. When we reason rhetorically, we … Continue reading Writing Thesis Statements as Enthymemes

What is a labor-based grading system and how will it produce a final course grade in a writing course?

This is a series of blogposts meant for students who are in courses using grading contracts of some kind to determine their final course grades, or those who just want to understand better what grades are, what they do in classrooms, and how they effect learning. This is the fourth post in a series of five blogposts meant to address…What … Continue reading What is a labor-based grading system and how will it produce a final course grade in a writing course?

Composition and the Irrational: Some Lacanian Concepts

Note: The picture above represents an internet meme called “Doge.” This is related to the LOL Cats meme, but Doge must feature a picture of a shiba inu dog (a Japanese dog, very active and smart, I have known one), several ungrammatical phrases, usually two words, starting with “very,” “so,” “much,” “many,” or “such,” rendered … Continue reading Composition and the Irrational: Some Lacanian Concepts

So You’re Going to Teach Composition

I wrote this originally for the composition TAs I am supervising, but the questions are relevant to anyone designing a university-level reading/writing course. In subsequent posts, I will expand on many of these ideas. These posts will be listed on the page, “Teaching First-Year Composition.” When I taught my first composition course, more than 30 … Continue reading So You’re Going to Teach Composition

Use of Screencasts for Providing Feedback

The benefits of screencast to provide feedback, I have found, has been a real learning experience during the covid teaching experience. Scholars of writing pedagogy have long advocated that we should rethink how we provide feedback during writing activities. Such methods, Anson, Dannels, and Laboy (2016) found, "allow students to perceive an individualized instructional process … Continue reading Use of Screencasts for Providing Feedback

A WPA Roundtable: Implementing Program-Wide Writing Studies-Based Composition Pedagogies

A WPA Roundtable: Implementing Program-Wide Writing Studies-Based Composition Pedagogies Abstract In this roundtable, five WPAs discuss how they implemented program-wide writing studies-based curricula, addressing concerns such as expertise, labor, resistance, and assessment. Introduction The history of so-called “writing about writing” approaches to teaching composition is well-documented (Downs and Wardle, “Teaching”; Wardle and Downs, “looking”; Bird, … Continue reading A WPA Roundtable: Implementing Program-Wide Writing Studies-Based Composition Pedagogies

Improve class discussions with Bloom’s Taxonomy

So many class discussions could become an improved learning experience for students with a little more guidance from the instructor. That assessment is based on observing classes as a member of the University of Florida Graduate Student Teaching Awards Committee. I’ve been listening to class discussions in a wide range of disciplines – psychology, educational … Continue reading Improve class discussions with Bloom’s Taxonomy